* R300

* WINE GLASS SET

OMAGUGU MAKHATHINI

* “Be one in a lifetime,

not one in a million”

– Miss Plus Size

ARE WE READY

FOR A FEMALE PRESIDENT?

WOMEN’S MONTH

* Ex-student salutes his mom

Banele’s art

takes a taxi

Vol9 no5 2017

heita!

STAY IN THE PICTURE

TAKE-OFF

I’M Joy GcinIe Dlamini (20). I’M FROM Fourways, Johannesburg. I’M STUDYING Events Management at the Department of Tourism, Faculty of Management Sciences. WHAT’S THAT, YOU MIGHT WANT TO KNOW. WELL, LET ME BRING YOU INTO THE PICTURE: Events Management isn’t only about orgainising big parties. It’s a diverse industry which covers a wide range of subjects, such as Risk Management and Marketing, and creates a different atmosphere (theme) for different events. Events Management is not only glitz and glamour, nor is it easy. It’s pretty hard work. I HAVE DECIDED TO STUDY IN THIS FIELD BECAUSE I love working with people, even though I’m an introvert. It helps me to understand the different types of personalities as well as seeing what abilities I have to make their experiences worthwhile. AFTER COMPLETION OF MY STUDIES, I WOULD LIKE TO be an Events Coordinator/Planner and have my own events company.

MPHO KHOROMBI, a Visual Communication (Photography) student, took this month’s cover image. HAPPY WOMEN’S DAY to all our female readers!

please send your name and cell number to heita@tut.ac.za on or before 18 August 2017. Mark the subject field: GLASS

To win this

WINE GLASS SET,

A MOTHER’S LOVE & LESSONS

In view of Women’s Month, award-winning Journalist and former TUT student, Trevor Hlungwani (26), writes about the lessons he has learnt from his mother, Muthavini.

“Looking back to when I was six years old, I fondly remember what made me happy. Happiness was standing on a chair, reaching for one of my mother’s church uniforms and helping myself to the coins she had collected to offer at church. After some months, she started suspecting that something was not right.

 

The last straw that broke the camel's back was when I went for a R10 note. My mother decided to be smart with me. While I was at school, she partially dipped all the coins in black shoe polish. On my return, she told me the money belonged to a local old woman and that the latter had powers to swallow kids who stole from their parents. It was the last day I stole from her.

 

My childhood is full of joyful and bright memories. This is normally the case when you are brought up by a loving mother. Although she is very strict, she always wanted the best for my siblings and I. I am who I am today because of her example to lead a good life.

 

Whenever she said she loved me, I used to think that she has a funny way of showing it. That is because she never spared the rod when I had done something unacceptable.

 

 

One of the greatest lessons I've learnt from her is to love and share with other people – even if they are not family.

 

Conventional wisdom has always ruled that kids who are foul-mouthed are generally from families that didn't cultivate good manners. Most kids naturally go through this phase during childhood. My mother always said that some habits are quick to learn, but may take a lifetime to unlearn.

 

I was raised in a household that was strictly a no-swearing zone. Every time I would swear, mom would pinch my tongue to make sure that it doesn't become a habit.

 

Some communities regard people who didn't go to school as of a lower class and, possibly, less intelligent. My mother didn't go to school but she understood the importance of education; as a result, she instilled the love for it in me and my siblings.

 

Of course, there were funny moments too. One such was writing debt-collection letters on her behalf to people who had borrowed money from her. In those instances, I would sit while she told me what to write.”

Mother and son, Trevor and Muthavini Hlungwani.

Trevor won the Impact Story of The Year Award at the Prestigious 28th Annual Caxton Excellence Awards. He currently works at the Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital as a Communications Officer.

I AM WHO I AM BECAUSE OF HER

VOX POP

MRS PRESIDENT

Is SA ready for a female President?

Heita! readers tell us what they think

BE YOU!

TUT’s first-ever Miss Plus Size is Khanyisile Nkamana (22), an Information Technology student at the Soshanguve Campus. We met the ambassador for fully-figured women.

Miss Plus Size, Khanyisile Nkamana (22).

BORN AND BRED? In a small town called Siyabuswa,

Mpumalanga.

 

WHY DID YOU ENTER? To raise awareness of such events,

especially that being fully-figured doesn’t mean that you are not

good enough. I also wanted to explore a different side of student life,

away from the mundane routine of being at the res, class or library.

 

WHAT ARE THE STEREOTYPES OF FULLY-FIGURED

WOMEN? That we eat a lot, are unfit, lazy and basically good for

nothing.

 

HAVE YOU EVER EXPERIENCED VICTIMISATION? Yes,

quite a number of times. At first, it really took its toll, to such an

extent that I went on starvation diets resulting in eating disorders.

However, I realised that society’s opinions don’t define me, so why

should I allow them to break me? I then started to become my own

motivation. I’ve learnt that the person you see when standing in front

of the mirror should be your number one fan and motivator. This

approach has brought me to where I am today, wearing the most

essential attribute: Confidence!

 

SOME PEOPLE SAY THAT THESE COMPETITIONS SEND

OUT THE WRONG MESSAGE TO YOUNG PEOPLE, AMONG

OTHERS THAT IT’S OK TO BE OVERWEIGHT. Not at all! It

tells you to look at yourself differently, not to compare yourself to

others, not to allow anything and anyone to demean you or tell you

that  you should look different. Embrace yourself and your body.

Love and take care of yourself.

 

HOW DO YOU INTEND TO CHANGE THE PERCEPTION

THAT IN ORDER TO FIT IN, YOU HAVE TO BE SKINNY?

Your physique doesn’t define you. How you look, shouldn’t limit your

potential. Stand up and set your own trends.

HOW DOES THE

MEDIA CONTRIBUTE

TO THE

PERCEPTION THAT

TO BE ACCEPTED,

ONE SHOULD LOOK

A CERTAIN WAY?

Mostly by broadcasting

pageants and

advertisements for

clothing brands, slimming

products, food, etc. with

strong undertones

looking down at fuller

figures. The list is

endless.

ADVICE FOR STUDENTS TO BE COMFORTABLE IN THEIR

OWN SKINS? Girls, if you don’t love yourself, no one else will. If

you don’t take yourself seriously, no one else will. If you allow

negativity in your life, how in the world will positivity find a space in it?

Keep an open and positive mind. Be honest with yourself. Accept

who you are and strive to be not just one in a million, but one in a

lifetime. Remember “to do you!”

 

YOUR ROLE MODELS? I look up to all the people who have

raised me to be who I am today. They always hoped that one day

the teachings, positivity and values that they instilled will rub off.

 

FUTURE PLANS? Currently, I am wrapping up my studies. I want

to study further, become an entrepreneur, own businesses and

property, and most importantly, travel the world to learn different

traditions and experience new ways of life. I also aspire to be

an entertainer.

 

 

PROUDLY PLUS SIZE

TAXIS & TRUCKING

FOOD TRUCKING: In keeping with current trends, Interior Design students were recently challenged to design a fun food truck. The brief did not only test them to come up with an eye-catching exterior, but also to research and design a technically functional mobile kitchen suitable for the specific food truck. Their concepts included presentation drawings, typographic design, technical CAD drawings and a 3-dimensional model.

LOOK OUT! Fine Arts alumnus and part-time lecturer, Banele Khoza is the national winner of the SA Taxi Foundation Art Awards 2017. His artworks will appear on 10 taxis on national routes for a period of six months. The prize includes an extensive publicity campaign aimed at creating national awareness of his work.

PHOTO of Banele by Tatenda Chidora

For this special Women’s Month  edition, Jackey Masekela speaks to singer, songwriter, lyricist, vocal coach and choir conductor, Omagugu Makhathini. She studied Music at TUT and recently released her debut album, called uThingo LweNkosazana.

Jackey Masekela

Omagugu Makhathini

TAKE US THROUGH THE WRITING PROCESS OF YOUR MUSIC AND TELL US MORE ABOUT uTHINGO LweKOSAZANA. I never plan to write a song. Songs come to me in melodies or in lyrics. I could be driving, taking a shower or cooking. I will then be gifted with a melody which I will need to record immediately, as they come in that moment. If not captured, they disappear forever. uThingo LweNkosazana is very special, not only because it is my debut album. It was recorded when I was carrying my second born son, whose name is Thingo. uThingo LweNkosazana is a tapestry of sounds, melody and rhythm. It symbolises a new beginning. It is also a celebration of life and love.

 

WHAT ARE YOUR FUTURE PLANS AND CAN WE EXPECT YOU TO GIVE A CONCERT AT TUT ONE DAY? I am currently working on my second album and am very excited as it is taking a completely different direction from the first one in terms of sound and ambience. I would love to come to TUT and have a concert there. Hopefully, I get an invitation soon.

WHERE DID THE LOVE FOR MUSIC START? At a very young age. Growing up in the countryside, I was always surrounded by music. There was singing all around me, whether it was at church, traditional ceremonies, or at school. My mom was also a lover and collector of music. I used to listen to her records and I discovered a new world filled with happiness. I knew from that moment on that I wanted to be a musician.

 

WHY DID YOU RELEASE YOUR DEBUT ALBUM ONLY NOW AND NOT EARLIER, AFTER GRADUATING? After graduating I was already touring as a back-up singer. I felt it was important for me to learn the workings of the music industry and grow as a musician first.

 

YOU DO A LOT OF COMMUNITY WORK AND TEACHING OF YOUNGSTERS. WHAT FULFILMENT DO YOU GET FROM THIS? I love kids and I've always had a love for teaching. When one spends time with children, they teach you so much about yourself. Kids have such innocence, honesty and unconditional love.

CONVERSATION

heita!

STAY IN THE PICTURE

Heita! is an electronic student newsletter of the Tshwane University of Technology (TUT).

 

It is edited and published by the Directorate of Corporate Affairs and Marketing.

 

EDITOR

Gerrit Bester

TEL 012 382 4306

 

WRITE TO US AT

heita@tut.ac.za

 

LAYOUT

Urbancrew

info@urbancrew.co.za

 

PREVIOUS EDITIONS

 

This publication may contain third party advertisements and links to third party sites. The Tshwane University of Technology does not make any representation as to the accuracy or suitability of any of the information contained in these advertisements or sites and does not accept any responsibility or liability for the conduct or content of those advertisements and sites and the offerings made by the third parties.

 

Is South Africa ready for a female president?
YES
NO
GENDER SHOULDN’T BE THE DECIDING FACTOR

win R300

It’s easy! All you have to do is answer the following

question (don’t fret, you should get the answer somewhere

in this edition): WHO IS MISS PLUS SIZE?

 

 

YOLANDE MARKGRAAFF (30), a Road Traffic and Municipal Policing student at the Soshanguve Campus, is the winner of the competition featured in Heita! Vol9 no4 2017.

 

CONGRATULATIONS!

SPEND THE R300 WISELY.

The winner of the POWER BANK is THATO BANDA (22), an Information Technology student at the Soshanguve Campus.

All work and no play make Jack (and Jill) a dull boy (and girl).

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